Norwegian lawmaker nominates President Trump for Nobel Peace Prize

Politics

President Donald Trump speaks to the 2020 Council for National Policy Meeting, Friday, Aug. 21, 2020, in Arlington, Va. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

OSLO, Norway (NewsNation Now) — A member of the Norwegian Parliament has nominated President Donald Trump for the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize.

Christian Tybring-Gjedde, a member of the Norwegian parliament for the right-wing Progress Party, submitted the nomination for his role in brokering a peace deal between Israel and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

“It is a unique deal,” Tybring-Gjedde said.

Tybring-Gjedde also said he nominated Trump this year because of the U.S. troop withdrawal from Iraq.

“No matter how Trump acts at home and what he says at press conferences, he has absolutely a chance at getting the Nobel Peace Prize,” Tybring-Gjedde, told The Associated Press.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee, which decides on the award, declined to comment. Under its rules, the information is required to be kept secret for 50 years.

Under Nobel Peace Prize rules, thousands of people are eligible to nominate candidates for the prestigious accolade, including members of national parliaments and governments, university professors, and past laureates.

The nomination comes after a White House official announced on Tuesday that the president will hold a signing ceremony on Sept. 15 to mark the conclusion of the deal, which was reached in August, after months of talks.

Under the agreement, the Gulf State consented to normal relations with Israel. In return, Israel said it would continue with plans to suspend its annexation of the West Bank.

The White House Press Secretary released the following statement about the nomination

Today, President Donald J. Trump was nominated for the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for his leadership in brokering the Abraham Accords, bringing about the full normalization of relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates and marking a major step toward a more peaceful Middle East. This historic diplomatic breakthrough between Israel and the United Arab Emirates is the most significant step toward peace in the Middle East in more than a quarter of a century.

This nomination comes amid widespread international support for the peace accords and optimism that the region finally may be turning a corner. By uniting two of America’s closest partners in the region—something many said could not be done—this agreement will create a more peaceful, secure, and prosperous Middle East.

This peace deal is a testament to the bold diplomacy and vision of President Trump, and he is honored to be considered by the Nobel Committee. President Trump will host the Israeli and Emirati delegations for a signing ceremony of the Abraham Accords on September 15 at the White House.

Tybring-Gjedde was one of two Norwegian officials to previously nominate Trump for the award in 2019 for his attempts to relax U.S. nuclear tensions with North Korea.

Last year Trump said he deserved to be awarded the Peace Prize, but his efforts were not recognized.

Former President Barack Obama, won the prize in 2009 just months into his first term in office. Trump has criticized the former president winning in the past.

“They gave one to Obama immediately after his ascent to the presidency, and he had no idea why he got it,” Trump said at the 2019 U.N. General Assembly in New York. “You know what, that was the only thing I agreed with him on.”

The Norwegian committee said it honored Obama for his commitment to “seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons.”

“It is now to hope that the Nobel Committee is able to consider what Trump has achieved internationally and that it does not stumble in established prejudice against the U.S. President,” Tybring-Gjedde said in a Facebook post.

Nominations for this year’s award closed on Jan. 31 and the winner will be announced on Oct. 9 in Oslo.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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