FBI agent repeatedly used photos of non-undercover co-workers in sex trafficking stings

U.S.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) seal is seen on the lectern following a press conference announcing the FBI’s 499th and 500th additions to the “Ten Most Wanted Fugitives” list on June 17, 2013 at the Newseum in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo by Mandel NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON (NewsNation Now) — Photos of female FBI staffers were used without written consent in undercover sex trafficking operations, according to the Office of the Inspector General.

An FBI Special Agent was reportedly behind the photos being posted, and it was not a part of a broader policy.

“The SA [special agent] who was the subject of the OIG’s investigation did not document which employees were used, obtain written consent from the employees, document the websites on which the photographs were posted, or document when the photographs were posted,” the memo stated.

It adds that the women were not undercover operatives or certified online covert employees.

The women involved had their faces blurred and were clothed, but the agent did not track what sites the photos were uploaded to. The agent also did not have information on if the photos were still on websites, if anyone had downloaded them or how long the photos had been posted.

According to the FBI memo, the photos of the women were used to pose as minor children or sex workers to entice predators on multiple social media websites.

The special agent asked the women involved not to tell their supervisors that their photos were being used in the operation.

“The OIG believes that this conduct poses potential adverse consequences for non-UCE/OCE employees participating in UC operations, including potentially placing them in danger of becoming the victims of criminal offenses,” the memo said.

Recommendations for reforms to ensure this doesn’t happen again were included in the Inspector General memo, and the FBI plans to draft a new policy soon to address the incident.

Read the Full Memo:

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