Where does your state’s minimum wage rank after latest bumps?

U.S.

(NEXSTAR) — In 2022, just about everything is getting more expensive. But in several states, people are getting paid a bit more, too.

While the federal minimum wage hasn’t budged since 2009 — it’s still $7.25 — more than half of the states decided to bump up their minimum wages this year. (Those hikes might not exactly be keeping up with inflation, but that’s another story.)

Some states opt not to set a minimum wage. Others have set their minimum wage at a number that’s lower than the federal minimum. In both cases, the federal minimum applies and businesses in those states must pay workers at least $7.25.

Here’s the new minimum wage in every state as of 2022, according to the Department of Labor.

  • Alabama: $7.25
  • Alaska: $10.34
  • Arizona: $12.80
  • Arkansas: $11
  • California: $14 for small companies; $15 for companies of 26+ workers
  • Colorado: $12.56
  • Connecticut: $13
  • Delaware: $10.50
  • District of Columbia: $15.20, but increasing to $16.10 on July 1
  • Florida: $10
  • Georgia: $7.25
  • Hawaii: $10.10
  • Idaho: $7.25
  • Illinois: $12
  • Indiana: $7.25
  • Iowa: $7.25
  • Kansas: $7.25
  • Kentucky: $7.25
  • Louisiana: $7.25
  • Maine: $12.75
  • Maryland: $12.50 (workers under 18 can make less)
  • Massachusetts: $14.25
  • Michigan: $9.87 (workers under 18 can make less)
  • Minnesota: $8.42 for companies with revenue under $500,000; $10.33 for companies making more
  • Mississippi: $7.25
  • Missouri: $11.15
  • Montana: $9.20 for companies with revenue over $110,000; federal minimum for others
  • Nebraska: $9
  • Nevada: $8.75 with health insurance provided; $9.75 without health insurance
  • New Hampshire: $7.25
  • New Jersey: $11.90 for seasonal workers or companies with 6 or fewer people; $13 for everyone else
  • New Mexico: $11.50
  • New York: $15 in Long Island, Westchester and NYC; $13.20 everywhere else
  • North Carolina: $7.25
  • North Dakota: $7.25
  • Ohio: $9.30 at companies making more than $342,000; $7.25 everywhere else
  • Oklahoma: $7.25
  • Oregon: $12.75
  • Pennsylvania: $7.25
  • Rhode Island: $12.25
  • South Carolina: $7.25
  • South Dakota: $9.95
  • Tennessee: $7.25
  • Texas: $7.25
  • Utah: $7.25
  • Vermont: $12.55
  • Virginia: $11 at companies with 4 or more employees; federal minimum everywhere else
  • Washington: $14.49
  • West Virginia: $8.75 at companies with 6 or more employees; federal minimum everywhere else
  • Wisconsin: $7.25
  • Wyoming: $7.25

Several states also have more minimum wage raises scheduled to take effect in the coming years. California, Connecticut and Massachusetts all have plans to get to $15/hour by 2023. New Jersey, Delaware, Illinois, Rhode Island, Florida and Maryland are also on the path to $15/hour in the next few years.

For workers who rely on tips, the Fair Labor Standards Act requires their wage and tips combine to make at least $7.25 an hour (or higher, based on state law).

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