Historic flood leaves North Texans assessing damage

Weather

(NewsNation) — Residents across North Texas are still surveying the damage, hoping and praying for relief soon after a historic rainstorm flooded the region, leaving behind boxes and piles of books soiled and businesses closed for cleanup.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signaled for help from FEMA Tuesday, declaring 23 counties in the Dallas-Fort Worth area “disaster areas” after more than nine inches of rain drenched the region in six hours, causing deadly and dangerous flash flooding on Monday.

It’s a natural disaster the region hasn’t experienced in 90 years.

Millions of Texans have been impacted by the storm but also their pets. When people are trying to be rescued from floodwaters, a lot of times their pets are left behind or in shelters.

However, several groups have been going in after the fact, even volunteering their time. Pilots have also gone in to rescue many of these animals. About 26 puppies and 29 cats, rescued by various organizations have been taken to New York and North Carolina.

Meanwhile, as the flood in northeast Texas start to recede, the storm system that sent floods rushing through streets and homes is shifting eastward toward Louisiana and Mississippi.

Deep tropical moisture flowing into the region will help trigger storms on and off throughout the week.

On Wednesday and Thursday, storm coverage in Louisiana and Mississippi may be even greater, with rain chances at about 80 to 90 percent. Otherwise, expect mostly cloudy skies and humid conditions.

Overall, rainfall amounts are expected to be in the 2-4 inch range through Friday, but some areas may see higher rainfall totals where there are localized torrential downpours or if storms are slow-moving. Minor flooding will be possible through at least Thursday, especially in areas that are low-lying or may have poor drainage.

In the tropics, the National Hurricane Center is keeping an eye on two tropical waves — one approaching the Caribbean, and one over Africa. Both systems have a 20 percent chance of formation over the next 5 days. 

In the last five weeks, five 1,000-year rain events have led to flooding across the U.S.

NewsNation affiliates WGNO contributed to this report.

© 1998 - 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. | All Rights Reserved.

Trending on NewsNation

Elections 2022

More Elections 2022