Hurricane Earl moving toward Northeast, slowing down

Weather
Hurricane Earl

Hurricane Earl was moving rapidly toward the Northeast early Saturday morning, but the National Hurricane Center said a significant reduction in its forward speed is expected. (Credit NOAA)

(NewsNation) — Hurricane Earl was moving rapidly toward the Northeast early Saturday morning, but the National Hurricane Center said a significant reduction in its forward speed is expected.

Earl pushed through the Atlantic late Friday, the New York Times said. From Saturday through Monday, it will move slowly northeastward to the southeast of Newfoundland.

Hurricane Earl, a Category 2 storm, was the only Saturday advisory by the National Hurricane Center, according to the Miami Herald.

The Miami Herald reported that Hurricane Earl could see some gradual development early next week as it moves into the Atlantic. One hurricane specialist, Robbie Berg, said it has a 20% chance of formation in the next five days.

“Earl is forecast to become a powerful hurricane-force extratropical low this afternoon,” the National Hurricane Center wrote. “Weakening is expected during the next few days, and Earl’s winds are likely to fall below hurricane force tonight or early Sunday.”

According to the Center, maximum sustained winds for Earl were 105 mph, with higher gusts. Hurricane-force winds extend outward to 90 miles from the center. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 415 miles.

Strong winds are in store for the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland starting this afternoon and going through Sunday, as Earl becomes a post-tropical low, the National Hurricane Center said.

Parts of the U.S. East Coast, Novia Scotia and Newfoundland are expected to be affected by swells generated by Hurricane Earl. These swells could cause “life-threatening surf and rip current conditions,” per the National Hurricane Center.

In Surf City, North Carolina, Emergency Management officials said swells from Earl were creating dangerous rip currents and “large breakers in the surf.”

“If you visit the beach, please pay attention to the flags and follow the guidance of our ocean rescue personnel,” Surf City NC Emergency Management said in a tweet. “If you see someone swimming in distress, call 911.”

As the Washington Post points out, the Atlantic hurricane season hasn’t had as much storminess compared to recent years — this August was the first in 25 years that didn’t see a single named storm.

© 1998 - 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. | All Rights Reserved.

Trending on NewsNation

Elections 2022

More Elections 2022